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Process

With a new form to deliver every day, Wright knew he had to devise a system beforehand if he wanted the finished set to work. So he set out to “create a system where each letter could show it’s own personality and characteristics, yet somehow, still maintain a sense of familiarity” with the rest of the letters in the set. To do this, he set some constraints: a black and white palette, and a commitment to developing the whole alphabet using basic geometric forms.

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Results

As the 36 days of the challenge progressed, Wright’ s letters developed a bit of a following. So soon after the 2015 edition wrapped, design blog Creative Bloq got in touch to feature both his work and the project itself [here]. And again featured in their annual recap of top type projects for the year. To finish it all out, Alexander made 36 (+1) printed sets, pictured in this post, which he sold before the end of the year.