University of Texas System: IDVSA / CLASE Report

IDVSA report / In-House International

IDVSA report / In-House International

IDVSA report / In-House International

Process

More than 28,000 students voluntarily and confidentially participated in an extensive online survey. Of those, 26,373 were enrolled in academic institutions, and 1,853 were enrolled at health institutions. Reports for individual academic institutions are posted on the CLASE website; data for the health institutions are reported in aggregate to ensure the results are scientifically valid.

Survey questions focused on three main areas:

  • Students’ experiences related to sexual assault and misconduct on and off campus since their enrollment at a UT System institution.
  • Students’ perceptions of their institution’s responses to these issues.
  • The impact of these forms of violence on students, such as missed classes or work, depression or increased use of drugs and alcohol.

We had a few months to develop 12 individual reports (one for each campus within the UT system), plus aggregate reports, based on the IDVSA’s groundbreaking data. Each report contained approximately 60+ pages of text and 30+ pages of distinct infographic materials.

The main audience for this report were members of the the University of Texas System, UT System Board of Regents, Chancellor McRaven and Presidents of the Twelve Campuses in the UT System. Additionally, this report was to be made available campus-wide and to the public in PDF form on the IDVA’s website. With this in mind, we set out to craft a polished, engaging and consistent design for the report—one that could be easily interpreted by the UT System’s administration, the public and the press.

IDVSA report / In-House International

IDVSA report / In-House International

IDVSA report / In-House International

Results

Upon the report’s unprecedented release in March 2017, CLASE saw wide distribution, including The New York Times, USA Today, Newsweek, The Guardian, Huffington Post, and The Wall Street Journal.

According to the IDVSA, many found the report groundbreaking, “because it: 1) uses both qualitative and quantitative research data to better understand, address and reduce acts of sexual harassment, stalking, dating/domestic abuse and violence and unwanted sexual contact on UT campuses; and 2) includes a longitudinal component in which researchers will repeatedly survey a select cohort of students to help understand their knowledge, attitudes and experiences over the course of their college careers.”

Overall, the report successfully communicated the importance of analyzing and addressing domestic abuse and sexual assault on college campuses and reignited the public’s commitment to fostering a safer culture in educational spaces.